New food certification for ‘FODMAP Friendly’ foods now available in Australia

  • December 2, 2013
  • Sophie Langley

Food products that are low in FODMAPs (including fructose-friendly and lactose-friendly foods) can now display a certification that identifies them as such, with a new log to help people advised to follow a Low FODMAP Diet launched in Australia.

The FODMAP Friendly logo was developed by Advanced Accredited Practicing Dietitian Dr Sue Shepherd and is the first Australian Government-approved labelling system for fructose-friendly and lactose-friendly foods.

What are FODMAPs?

An estimated 35 per cent of Australian consumers have intolerance towards foods and ingredients high in FODMAPs (which stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols) such as wheat, rye, apple, honey, legumes, onion, garlic and milk.

FODMAPs are a collection of sugars and related molecules that are found naturally in foods, and can often trigger symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) including bloating, wind, abdominal pain and changes in bowel habits (diarrhoea or constipation). FODMAPs trigger symptoms in one in eight people who suffer from IBS, and can also affect sufferers of coeliac disease and other inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s disease.

Certification logo makes shopping easier

FODMAP Friendly Certification Founder Dr Sue Shepherd said the labelling system is a “handy shopping companion” for those with specific dietary requirements who find looking at ingredients and packaging time-consuming and difficult.

“The new FODMAP Friendly logo is to help people advised to follow a Low FODMAP Diet easily identify and select suitable foods for their dietary needs,” Dr Shepherd said. “People who experience problems due to hidden ingredients in foods, and who find themselves spending time reading food packaging and labels will benefit from the new FODMAP Friendly logo,” she said.

Each food product is analysed independently in a food-testing laboratory before it is given the FODMAP Friendly accreditation.

Products and brands already using the new logo

Food products that already carry the logo include Kez’s Kitchen Low in Fructose Cereal and Snacks, a large range of Well and Good baking mixes, Bayview chicken and fish products, and Sue Shepherd All Natural Confectionary.

Australian Food News reported in October 2013 that Australian premium cereal, snack and biscuit manufacturer Kez’s Kitchen had launched a FODMAP Friendly range, available in Coles and Woolworths supermarkets.

Kez’s Kitchen said its three certified products were developed to meet a growing consumer demand.

“Similar to our popular gluten-free and lactose-free products, we’ve developed foods that cater for an overwhelming demand from consumers with specific dietary requirements, and yet still want great tasting product,” said Michael Carp, Managing Director of Kez’s Kitchen. “We hear regularly from shoppers who are frustrated with the lack of options readily available to them, or who experience daily confusion at the supermarket. These products provide a direct solution to these issues,” he said.

Dr Shepherd said brands such as Kez’s Kitchen using the FODMAP Friendly certification was a “huge step forward” for sufferers of IBS symptoms.

“This certification is a game-changer, eliminating the confusion faced every time they grocery shop and creating a benchmark for other manufacturers,” Dr Shepherd said. “Those experiencing IBS will now be able to eat delicious, readily available cereals and snacks that won’t trigger pain or discomfort after eating,” she said.

Food manufacturers can find out more by completing the enquiry form at www.fodmap.com.

The FODMAP Friendly logo


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